Category Archives: Across the Nation

Three Ways to Support Your Cancer Registrars

By Linda Corrigan, MHE, RHIT, CTR

Check boxCommission on Cancer (CoC) Cancer Program Standards 2016 are designed to ensure a comprehensive approach to the care and treatment of patients. Cancer programs seeking CoC accreditation must demonstrate that they’ve met or exceeded these standards—many of which require data tracking. Your cancer registrar can assist your clinicians in designing the best “tracking tool” for your program. For many programs, the best tool will be your cancer registry software. Cancer registrars well-versed in high quality data collection are key to the success of a cancer program. In turn, there are three critical ways your program can support its cancer registrars:

  • Make sure your cancer registrars are up-to-date by supporting training and continuing education opportunities. Change is a constant in the world of oncology. Treatments are advancing, CoC standards are added and/or revised, and state cancer registry data-collection guidelines are updated annually. A prime example of this constant change is the American Joint Committee on Cancer’s (AJCC) soon-to-be-released Cancer Staging Manual. The new 8th edition, scheduled for publication in October 2016, will revise how cancer is staged.
  • Encourage your cancer registrars to get involved in state and national organizations and provide funds for them to attend meetings and conferences. The key to helping your cancer registrar stay current is networking and continuing education. Some registrars have as many as three separate organizations and/or federal agencies that “set” the standards for exactly how and what data are collected from a facility’s cancer program. Cancer registrars who attend national conferences and state meetings or who are encouraged to volunteer for national and state-level organizations develop a network of colleagues from across the country that can be tapped as a resource when your program has questions.
  • Staff your cancer registry appropriately. The best way to support and retain your cancer registrar and to ensure high-quality data collection is to make sure you have the staffing bandwidth for the number of cancer cases your facility manages each year. Review NCRA’s Workload and Staffing Study: Guidelines for Hospital Cancer Registry Programs to help assess your staffing needs.

The National Cancer Registrars Association (NCRA) and the Association of Community Cancer Centers (ACCC) are two national associations that can help cancer programs support their cancer registrars. NCRA’s Annual Educational Conference provides a thorough and cost-effective way for cancer registrars to stay informed and to network. Attendees learn about updates to treatments and staging, CoC standards, clinical trials, and national trends. The 2017 conference, scheduled for April 5-8, in Washington, D.C., will focus on the AJCC’s 8th edition of the Cancer Staging Manual. Look for conference updates on the NCRA website here.  NCRA’s Center for Cancer Registry Education is a learning management system designed to provide easy access to high-quality educational programming. The website offers a variety of online products to help registrars tailor training and manage the continuing education credits needed to maintain their Certified Tumor Registrar (CTR) credential.

ACCC is also a great resource for cancer registrars. ACCCExchange, the association’s online member discussion forum, connects registrars with peer-to-peer solutions, strategies, and resources for how to best meet CoC standards. ACCC’s journal Oncology Issues provides in-depth articles on programmatic innovations implemented by ACCC member programs, coding updates, and advocacy issues—and can be a valuable resource for registrars to better understand advancements in cancer treatment and care. Coming in October, the ACCC 33rd National Oncology Conference in St. Louis will focus on practical “how to’s” for cancer programs and practices, with peer-to-peer learning on process improvement strategies, putting data to work to improve care, and more. Learn more here.

Contributing blogger ACCC member Linda Corrigan, MHE, RHIT, CTR, is president, National Cancer Registrars Association.

Tap Into the Expertise of Your Cancer Registrar

By Linda Corrigan, MHE, RHIT, CTR

ThinkstockPhotos-507273299Hospitals understand their cancer registry data are sent to state and federal agencies to document incidence rates and to identify cancer clusters. But many may not be realizing the full potential of their cancer registry database, a goldmine full of information that can help your facility. Hospital-specific data provide a wealth of information that can assist with financial and strategic planning, assessing timeliness of treatment, understanding survival rates, conducting community needs assessments, and implementing targeted marketing initiatives.

As the custodians of your data, cancer registrars know it better than anyone and can see trends as they happen. Make sure to include your cancer registrar in meetings and ask for updates. Tap into your cancer registrar’s expertise and put your data to work. Your cancer registrar can:

  • Help your program justify additional staff. For example, by monitoring case volume by site, year, and insurance coverage, your cancer registrar can supply data to make the case for adding physicians to your cancer program.
  • Run reports to identify patterns (or specifics) about who is seen in your cancer program by identifying referring physicians or hospitals. These data can help track trends in patient retention as well as outmigration.
  • Assist with quality improvement/process improvement initiatives. For instance, time to treatment is a frequent target for cancer program improvement efforts. Your cancer registrar can do a deep data dive into your patient population and uncover the exact profile of those patients experiencing the greatest delays.
  • Collect specific data to generate custom reports through user-defined fields in the database. What data do you want to collect? Many registrars have already started reviewing patients seen in the beginning of 2016, so now is the time to talk with your cancer registrar about any additional data you may need for future reports.
  • Compare your data (demographics and disease-site specific data) to that housed in several other national databases.
  • Support your Cancer Committee with data that identifies your patient population and specific health disparities in your service area as the triennial Community Needs Assessment is being completed.

These are just some of the many ways the expertise of your cancer registrar can support your cancer program. An upcoming ACCCBuzz blog post will explore the evolving role of cancer registrars and how your oncology program can support registrars as an integral member of the cancer care team.


ACCC Member Linda Corrigan, MHE, RHIT, CTR, is currently serving as President of the National Cancer Registrars Association.  Learn about the NCRA Annual Education Conference, April 5-7, 2017, here.  Explore NCRA’s Center for Cancer Registry Education here.  The January/February 2016 Oncology Issues features, “Unlock the Potential of the Cancer Registrar,” an article co-authored by Ms. Corrigan that describes how cancer registrars can support lung screening programs within community cancer centers.

MACRA Update—Will CMS Delay the Start Date?

By Brittney Fairman, Policy Analyst, ACCC

Calendar pages and clockLast week Andy Slavitt, Acting Administrator for the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS), told the Senate Finance Committee that the agency was considering “alternative start dates,” for Medicare Access and CHIP Reauthorization Act (MACRA) after receiving more than 3,000 comments on its proposed rule implementing the Quality Payment Program. The final rule is expected in November, leaving only a few months before the proposed reporting start date of January 1, 2017. Slavitt also said the agency is taking a close look at how the proposed rule would impact rural and small providers, particularly the low volume threshold that would exempt small practices from certain reporting requirements.

In our June 27 comment letter on the MACRA proposed rule, ACCC urged CMS to:

  • Delay implementation for six months to one year, to give physicians the time needed to build infrastructure and implement the Quality Payment Program effectively
  • Ensure that the agency provides adequate accommodations and protections for small group practices and solo practitioners
  • Modify the “resource use” methodology to ensure that eligible clinicians are held responsible only for the costs they can control
  • Include all Oncology Care Model (OCM) quality measures in MIPS
  • Refine the APM requirements to offer a meaningful alternative to MIPS and adopt policies to promote the availability of a wide variety of APMs and Physician-Focused Payment Models (PFPMs).

With this proposed rule, CMS aims to transition Medicare to a new physician payment program focused on quality, value, and accountability over volume. The MACRA legislation enacted by Congress outlines essentially two separate payment pathways for physicians under Medicare: The Merit-Based Incentive Payment System (MIPS), and the Alternative Payment Models (APMs). Both pathways are intended to drive the development of value-based payment. ACCC supports payment reform efforts; however, it is critical that CMS construct these pathways so that they are realistic, achievable avenues to Part B reimbursement.

ACCC will continue to keep members informed as MACRA implementation unfolds. For a deeper dive on new requirements under the Quality Payment Program, ACCC members can access the recent ACCC webinar, “MACRA CMS Proposed Rule: What You Need to Know” on demand (login required). The American Medical Association (AMA) has created a MACRA Checklist that outlines steps providers can take now to prepare, as we await the final rule.

Patient Navigation—Process Mapping by Disease Site

By Tricia Strusowski, MS, RN

ThinkstockPhotos-467463476For this patient navigation blog post, let’s talk about a recent hot topic on ACCCExchange, the online discussion forum for ACCC members: At what point in the care continuum do you initiate navigation and support services?

Many cancer programs have a difficult time identifying when to initiate these services. Cancer programs know that staff are duplicating services, but they don’t want anything to fall through the cracks for patients and their families. At busy cancer programs, staff may be challenged to find the time to sit down and work out these details. Plus, getting all the healthcare professionals together for one more meeting can be a daunting task. Cancer programs want to provide the best experience for their patients while utilizing staff efficiently. One way to support this goal is by involved the entire team in creating a disease-site-specific process map to review the continuum of care; discuss staff roles and responsibilities; identify gaps, barriers, opportunities for improvement; and goals of care—all with the patient at the center of the discussion. Simply put: Increasing communication among the team and decreasing duplication for the patient.

Who Should Participate?

Ideally, the team participating in the disease-site mapping process should be representative of the offices and departments that will touch the patient during his or her journey. Keep in mind: You need to include the “worker bees,” the staff who really know the details of the patient flow. Let’s consider a head and neck cancer patient for example. In this instance, the following individuals should be invited to participate:

  • Surgery
  • Medical oncology
  • Radiation oncology
  • Inpatient unit case manager and/or discharge planner
  • Speech/swallowing therapist
  • Navigator
  • Social worker
  • Financial counselor
  • Behavioral health
  • Rehabilitation/Prehabilitation
  • Dental office
  • Others (We all know there is always someone we forget to invite!)

Plan your first session for 1.5 to 2 hours. Admittedly, this may be a challenge to schedule but it can be done, and the results will be amazing. Utilizing a large paper flowchart (i.e.,15 feet long x 4 feet wide), the group needs to talk through and record the process starting at the patient’s earliest point of entry. Each detail must be discussed, including length of time from one episode of care to the next, delays, gaps, and opportunities for improvement. Encourage participants share their goals during the discussion and write everything down!

Revisit & Revise

Process mapping exercises are not a one-and-done experience. It takes several meetings to review and revise the process map. There may be key individuals or a process that are missed in a previous session; no big deal, add them to the group. A great facilitator is key to keep the team on task and keep the discussion moving.

After the entire disease-site process is complete, overlay when you would like the navigator and the support staff to intervene. Remember: the goal is to provide the intervention as soon as possible, hopefully in a proactive manner so that you are “staying one step ahead of the patient.” Incorporate when you would like to initiate the distress screening process, identifying periods of highest distress for the patient/family.

The draft process map is also an excellent tool to share with the disease-site-specific healthcare providers who are often are not aware of all the details, delays, and opportunities to enhance the patient experience. Further, your process map will also be excellent tool for on-boarding new staff and for succession planning. Review and update your process map on a bi-yearly or annual basis.

 Go Team!

I always share that the disease-site-specific team is like a football team; the better all the players understand everyone’s role and how to best support the patient and each other, the stronger the team will be. Every team always wants what is best for the patient. The mapping process is a valuable approach to not just identify gaps or delays in the care continuum, but to also then go the extra mile to identify “what is best for the patient.”

Work smarter not harder; teamwork makes the dream work!

________________________________________________

Guest blogger Tricia Strusowski, MS, RN, is a consultant with Oncology Solutions, LLC.

Meals or Mammograms? A Decision No One Should Have to Make

By Renea Duffin

Guest blogger Renea Duffin is Vice President of Cancer Support and Outreach, Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Center in Baton Rouge, LA .

Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Center Mobile Medical Clinic

Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Center Mobile Medical Clinic

For many people living in Southeast Louisiana, choosing between paying for a mammogram (or other preventive health screening) or a meal for their family is a decision that can lead to a late- stage cancer diagnosis. And, unfortunately, this happens far too often in many Louisiana communities. Read on to learn how Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Center, a 2016 ACCC Innovator Award winner, has grown its outreach and screening efforts to improve early detection of cancer for the medically underserved.

Collaboration for Comprehensive Outreach

In Louisiana, one in five residents live in poverty, so it is no surprise the state’s cancer mortality rate is the fourth highest in the nation. There are only three other states with a greater uninsured population. In 2002, Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Center began its comprehensive community outreach program to address Louisiana’s disproportionate cancer death rates. Through this innovative initiative, the Center collaborates with many community partners and generous donors to provide free breast, prostate, colorectal, skin and oral cancer screenings for the underserved, underinsured and uninsured members of our 18-parish service area.

Integrating Patient Navigation to Improve Access

As the program continued to grow and evolve, it became evident that not only were screening participants medically underserved, but they faced many other barriers to care such as low health literacy levels, unreliable transportation, and other restricting socioeconomic factors. This led to the implementation of a patient navigation program in 2008 that assists patients receiving an abnormal screening result in accessing additional testing, physician specialists, financial resources, as well as removing other barriers to care.

By the Numbers—Education, Screening, & Early Detection

The following are some additional facts and information about the Center’s education and early detection program:

  • Each year, two mobile medical clinics deliver more than 8,000 free screenings for five types of cancer.
  • More than 74,000 screenings provided and 503 cancers diagnosed since 2002. The Cancer Center’s screening program rate of cancer diagnoses is nearly double the national rate per 1,000 adults screened.
  • Provides screenings outside regular business hours in convenient locations and in areas where they are most needed. Locations and populations are targeted based on zip code data using a powerful database solution.
  • Average time from screening to resolution (diagnosis or all clear) is 10 days compared to the national standard of care, which is 60 days. This expedited timeline is due to collaborative, close working relationships with service providers and the patient navigator’s hands-on approach to patient interactions.

After over a decade of providing education, early detection and navigation services to the medically underserved, we know there is still much to do. We constantly reassess our programs and strategies to ensure we are meeting the needs of those we serve in the hope there will be a day when no one must choose between accessing healthcare services and feeding their family.

At the upcoming ACCC 33rd National Oncology Conference October 19-21, in St. Louis, Missouri, Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Center and all the 2016 ACCC Innovator Award winners will describe their inspirational approaches to complex challenges in delivering quality care to serve their communities. View conference agenda and register today!

ACCC Members Bring Sun Safety Awareness to their Communities

by Amanda Patton, ACCC Communications

453142595May is designated as Skin Cancer Awareness Month and the National Council on Skin Cancer Prevention has named today “Don’t Fry Day” to encourage sun safety awareness.

As we head into the summer, community swimming pools open, families and friends gather for picnics and barbecues, and thousands head to beaches and lakes for fun in the sun. Recent statistics from the American Academy of Dermatology (AAD) make clear the critical need to keep sun safety on everyone’s radar screen:

  • Estimates are 1 in 5 Americans will develop skin cancer in their lifetime
  • 8,500 people in the U.S. are diagnosed with skin cancer every day
  • Melanoma rate in the U.S. have doubled from 1982 to 2011

This month and throughout the year, ACCC Cancer Program Members and their staff play an important role in educating their communities on skin cancer prevention, early detection, and screening. For example:

In Delaware, Christiana Care Helen F. Graham Cancer Center schedules free Skin Cancer Screening Awareness programs just ahead of the Memorial Day weekend. The evening education sessions—offered in both English and Spanish—include information on self exams, risk factors, and how to protect yourself and your family. The programs use AAD materials and also promote a Delaware state skin cancer education and awareness program.

In Maryland, at Atlantic General Hospital, Regional Cancer Care Center, skin cancer awareness activities during the month of May include a digital display slide on hospital lobby TVs calling attention to the need for farmers to stay skin safe; Facebook posts with sun safety tips and resources; and free skin checks by Atlantic General Dermatology at the Annual Ocean City Health Fair.

In Idaho, St. Luke’s Mountain States Tumor Institute, developed the POOL COOL program to bring sun safety education to community swimming pools.

Each year, Skin Cancer Awareness Month serves as a call to action, an opportunity to spread the message on sun safety and skin cancer prevention. ACCC thanks all of our member programs and their multidisciplinary care providers for their efforts in May—and throughout the year—promoting health in their communities through education on prevention, screening, and early detection.

Reaching Out, Serving Our Communities

One in an occasional blog series on topics from Oncology Issues, the journal of the Association of Community Cancer Centers.

by Susan van der Sommen, MHA, CMPE, FACHE, ACCC Editorial Committee Chair

The words community on a bulletin boardDue to mandates in the Affordable Care Act (ACA) and revised Commission on Cancer standards, community outreach programs have become more prevalent in recent years with an enhanced mission of reaching community-dwelling consumers who do not utilize the healthcare system in a manner that is effective for achieving optimal health outcomes. ACCC-member programs play an important role in these efforts, and are actively engaged in outreach initiatives as varied as the populations they intend to reach. Here are just a few examples.

Grant Medical Center in Columbus, Ohio, winner of a 2012 ACCC Innovator Award, launched a Convenient Care Mammography Program aimed at providing mammography to working women on their lunch breaks. The program removes excuses that women often make to avoid getting their annual screenings—from “I’m too busy” to “the timing is not convenient”—by providing a streamlined, time-efficient process, convenient scheduling, and even transportation!

Since 2006, St. Luke’s Mountain States Tumor Institute, a multi-site cancer program serving southern Idaho, eastern Oregon, and northern Nevada, has been developing community-based approaches to youth-based prevention education programs that address such issues as tobacco use, sun safety, and healthy lifestyle habits.

To better serve its community Klabzuba Cancer Center at Texas Health Harris Methodist Hospital Fort Worth employs two mobile health coaches with full examination facilities, as well as mammography suites to bring screening services and education to work sites and rural locations, removing barriers to care access. To provide these services, this 2013 ACCC Innovator Award winner has partnered with businesses, government agencies, and other local organizations.

The Bassett Cancer Institute with its flagship site in rural Cooperstown, New York, began a cancer screening outreach program in 2008, which in 2014 won the HANYS Community Health Improvement Award.  Recognizing that the socioeconomic status, geography, and lack of effective public transportation in their eight-county region impacts the ability of patients to access preventive services, the mobile coach, which was constructed with a digital mammography and a self-contained clinical unit, travels to a variety of community-based sites, enabling staff to reach more underserved people with mammograms, clinical breast exams, Pap smears, and colorectal cancer screenings than through routine office visits.

The cover story of the May/June 2016 edition of Oncology Issues highlights Christiana Care’s Community Health Outreach and Education Program, which takes community outreach to a new level by incorporating a tailored approach designed to reach a culturally diverse population in a manner that is comfortable and welcoming.

The American Journal of Preventative Medicine notes that “cultural competence in an individual or organization implies having the capacity to function effectively within the context of the cultural beliefs, behaviors, and needs presented by consumers and their communities.”

Christiana Care’s outreach and education program was designed with the inherent understanding that a “one size fits all” or “open our doors and they will come” approach will not always work—particularly with disparate populations. Their solution? Set up shop in the local farmer’s market where more than 75 culturally diverse vendors sell their products. Christina Care’s concerted effort to employ multicultural, bilingual staff and deploy the team in a non-traditional venue where they are guaranteed to reach the population is not only innovative, but also very effective.  Where better to reach a population than in a place where they already come together both for work and pleasure?

According to the Institute of Medicine report, Health Literacy: A Prescription to End Confusion, health literacy is defined as “the degree to which individuals can obtain, process, and understand the basic health information and services they need to make appropriate health decisions.” The same report notes that nearly half of all American adults—90 million people—have inadequate health literacy to navigate the healthcare system. Inequitable delivery of care and the resulting disparities affect the overall health and well-being of individuals in a manner that may ultimately result in a public health concern.

The farmer’s market outreach and education program developed by Christiana Care is a successful formula for ensuring that education and outreach occurs not only within the communities it serves, but also in a manner that speaks to patients—quite literally—in a language they can understand.

 

 

Key Takeaways from Congressional Hearing on “Medicare Drug Experiment”

By Brittney Fairman, Policy Analyst, ACCC

Capitol BuildingOn Tuesday, May 17, the U.S. House Energy and Commerce Committee Subcommittee on Health held a hearing titled “The Obama Administration’s Medicare Drug Experiment: The Patient and Doctor Perspective,” which focused on CMS’ proposed Medicare Part B Drug Payment Model. The Subcommittee heard from witnesses representing the provider and patient communities, including:

  • Debra Patt, MD, MPH, MBA, Vice President of Texas Oncology and Medical Director of The US Oncology Network;
  • Marcia Boyle, President and Founder of the Immune Deficiency Foundation;
  • Michael Schweitz, MD, FACP, MACR, National Advocacy Chair of the Coalition of State Rheumatology Organizations;
  • Heather Block, a patient advocate; and
  • Joe Baker, President of the Medicare Rights Center.

Notably, the hearing echoed many of the concerns ACCC and fellow stakeholders have been voicing since CMS released the proposal in early March. Key takeaways include:

CMS is operating under a false premise that there are always less costly therapeutic equivalents available to treat patients. In the case of oncology, treatment situations where there are true clinical substitutes are “few and far between,” Dr. Patt pointed out. When a therapeutically equivalent drug does exist, those drugs are not always available to every clinician nor are they always most conducive to a patient’s specific treatment plan.

The proposed demonstration will create barriers to patient access and have a disproportionate impact on rural areas. With a lack of appropriate safeguards, healthcare providers fear the demonstration program would create additional financial pressures that would push rural or small physician practices out of business.  For patients in rural areas – or patients that require more expensive therapies – this may cause difficulty in accessing oncology care.

CMS’ proposal is akin to an involuntary clinical trial. Witnesses and Committee members pointed out that CMS’ experiment is not unlike a clinical trial, requiring participation of providers and their patients for the purposes of data collection. However, unlike a clinical trial, participation is involuntary and the proposal lacks critical patient safeguards – patients may never know if their provider is operating under a control or experimental arm of CMS’ demonstration. This randomized trial will, unknowingly and unwillingly, limit patient access to needed care.

Average Sales Price (ASP), by definition, is an average. Many community oncologists – often smaller practices – are not able to gain price advantages and are currently paying well above ASP for Part B drugs. Any further reductions to reimbursement will make it impossible for providers to cover the acquisition cost of many, if not most, cancer treatments.

Witnesses also addressed a series of “carve-outs” that have been discussed by policymakers, including for oncology providers, the Oncology Care Model (OCM) participating practices, or rural providers. Dr. Patt, however, pointed out that “there’s no right way to do the wrong thing.” Most witnesses called for a full withdraw of CMS’ proposal.

These points and more can be found in ACCC’s comments, submitted to CMS in early May. ACCC is continuing to monitor Congressional efforts on the CMS proposal.

Financial Advocates: Helping to Close the Gap

Amanda Patton, ACCC Communications

Hands-creating-circle-of-supportThe just-released 2016 CancerCare Patient Access and Engagement Report provides the oncology community with a comprehensive look at cancer patients’ perspectives of real-world issues that accompany patients along the care continuum from diagnosis through treatment and beyond. The landmark study encompasses six surveys capturing responses from 3,000 cancer patients representing a broad diversity of ethnicity, income, education, geography, age, insurance, cancer type, and treatment stage.

Cancer program staff who serve as financial advocates helping patients navigate the economic challenges cancer brings will not be surprised by the results of Survey 4: Financial and Insurance Issues. Among the survey’s key findings:

  • Only about half of respondents report understanding their health insurance coverage for their cancer care “completely” or “very well.”
  • 58% of respondents reported being distressed about their finances during treatment.
  • 20% to 30% of patients reported having trouble estimating their out-of-pocket costs before incurring medical expenses.
  • To afford treatment, one-third of respondents (ages 25 to 54) reported cutting back on daily necessities, including groceries and transportation, and/or borrowed from family members and friends.

As these findings show, financial toxicity remains a top-level issue for patients with cancer, and the need to close the gaps in addressing the economic impact of cancer on patients and their families is critical.

At many cancer programs today, financial advocates are helping to close these gaps by:

  • Helping patients understand the costs of care;
  • Facilitating pre-authorizations and pre-certifications;
  • Connecting patients with patient assistance programs, copay support programs, and foundation support;
  • Accessing community resources to meet patient financial needs, and more.

The ACCC Financial Advocacy Network (FAN) is a partner in this effort bringing training, resources, and peer-to-peer support to oncology financial navigators and advocates.  The  Financial Advocacy Network (FAN) Case-Based Workshops bring these professionals together to share effective practices and strategies for the evolving healthcare coverage landscape, and to join in collaborative problem solving.  Learn more and view upcoming workshop schedule here.

ACCC Voices Part B Demo Concerns on Capitol Hill & at CMS

By Amanda Patton, ACCC, Communications

ACCC-PartB-Demo-Meeting-Capitol Hill-crop2With the Medicare Part B Drug Payment Model comment deadline fast approaching (Monday, May 9 at 5:00 pm EDT), ACCC continued its push to educate policymakers on the detrimental impact this ill-conceived proposal will have on community cancer care, providers, and patients.

This morning ACCC President Jennie R. Crews, MD, MMM, FACP;  ACCC Past President Ernest Anderson Jr., MS, RPh, FASHP; and Leah Ralph, Director of Health Policy, ACCC; together with representatives from the Hematology/Oncology Pharmacy Association (HOPA) and the Oncology Nursing Society (ONS), traveled to Capitol Hill to meet with Senate Finance Committee staff and discuss concerns about the Part B proposal’s impact on cancer care. During the meeting, ACCC shared information from a data analysis that reveals the significant financial impact the proposal would have on providers and patients.

In a meeting with CMS Center for Medicare and Medicaid Innovation (CMMI) staff on Monday afternoon, ACCC leadership, along with representatives from HOPA, and ONS—reflected the voice of multidisciplinary cancer care providers.  ACCC shared results from the Part B proposal data analysis and reiterated ACCC’s strong concerns that are reflected in our comment letter to the agency.  Read our comment letter.

Stay tuned for advocacy updates from ACCC.