ACA Repeal Efforts Stalled in Washington

by Blair Burnett, Policy Analyst, ACCC

U.S. Capitol

Despite much debate, healthcare reform remains in flux in Washington after a round of critical votes in the U.S. Senate this week. In the latest effort to repeal the Affordable Care Act (ACA), on Tuesday, July 25, the U.S. Senate voted 51-50, with Vice President Mike Pence breaking the tie vote, for a motion to proceed, which set up a process allowing for open debate and amendments to the AHCA, the House version of ACA repeal, on the Senate floor.

On Tuesday evening, the U.S. Senate brought to the floor their latest version of the Better Care Reconciliation Act (BCRA) with the added Cruz Amendment, allowing for sale of low-cost insurance plans if insurance policies that comply with the “essential services” provision of the ACA are also sold. The bill needed 60 votes to pass, but only received 43.

Debate continued Wednesday, July 26, and the U.S. Senate brought a repeal only bill to the floor, the Obamacare Repeal Reconciliation Act (ORRA), without language of a replacement effort. The vote, 45-55, showcased the lack of support among either party to vote for healthcare reform without actionable legislation.

As of Thursday, July 27, Senators were still in debate, bringing various amendments to floor for a vote. Late Thursday evening, a “skinny bill” was brought forth, that sought to roll back both the individual and employer mandate from the ACA. The text of this bill was not made available for public review, but besides repeal of the individual and employer mandate, left much of the ACA in place. When brought to a vote in the U.S. Senate, the bill failed, with a 49-51 vote in dissension of passage.

CBO estimates stated that the number of individuals insured would have decreased by 16 million by 2026 if the “skinny bill” were to pass and continue to become formal legislation. In the same time frame, the CBO estimates stated the federal deficit would have decreased by $142 billion, and premiums would have increased by an average of 20 percent.

For now, ACA repeal efforts and larger healthcare reform has stalled. More changes are certain to come from the Hill in the coming months as bipartisan healthcare reform legislation is expected to be drafted. Based upon the four pillars of ACCC’s health reform principles, a “skinny repeal” of the ACA would likely have destabilized current insurance markets, and placed increased burdens on cancer patients, specifically, elderly, low-income Americans accessing insurance in the individual and non-group markets. This week, ACCC joined over 30 other provider and patient groups to advocate against a skinny repeal of the ACA bill.

Senate Social Media Campaign - Skinny Repeal 7-27-17
As new legislation is brought forth, ACCC will continue to monitor and analyze impacts healthcare reform will have on cancer patients across the country.


ACCC members can gain an in-depth understanding of how CMS’ proposed CY 2018 Medicare rules will impact oncology by participating in ACCC’s August 9 webinar, “CMS Proposed 2018 OPPS & PFS Rules: What You Need to Know.” Learn more [member log-in required].

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