CANCERSCAPE Kicks Off with Perspectives on Policy and Business

by Amanda Patton, ACCC Communications

Last week’s events on Capitol Hill provided a dramatic backdrop for the ACCC 43rd Annual Meeting, CANCERSCAPE, March 29-31, bringing together hundreds of oncology professionals from around the country for insights, strategies, and perspective in the midst of healthcare reform ambiguities.

Cancerscape 2017-keynote panelIn a keynote session Thursday morning, policy insiders Kavita Patel, MD, MS, of The Brookings Institution, and Dan Todd, JD, Todd Strategy, LLC, shared insights on possible next steps toward Affordable Care Act (ACA) repeal or repair under the Trump Administration. ACCC Health Policy Director Leah Ralph moderated the point-counterpoint discussion covering what went wrong with the House Republicans’ American Health Care Act (AHCA) legislative effort at ACA repeal, mounting political pressures on Capitol Hill, legislative or administrative options to effect ACA repair, flaws in the design of the faltering individual insurance exchanges and what may (or may not) happen next, and whether the Administration will act on the hot button issue of drug pricing.

Cancerscape 2017 keynote panel 2Asked for one final takeaway that attendees should bring back to their programs to help their colleagues understand the policy landscape, Dr. Patel shared this perspective for frontline clinicians and administrators:

“No matter who is the party in power there’s always going to be this emphasis on cost. I don’t see the pressure to decrease costs going away. It may come in the form of programs like MIPS and commercial programs like ACOs and patient-centered medical homes, but as a physician who is in all of those programs, it’s all about having me [as a physician] understand where I’m over utilizing care . . . . If there’s one takeaway . . . it’s not to sit . . . and wait to see how things shake out.” Start looking for where you have unwarranted variation, where you can start implementing programs that actually matter to patients, Dr. Patel advised. “Take back some introspective ability to look at your variation, look at your costs, look at all the things that fall into P & L for administrators and how do you translate that to where clinical care is delivered.”

Dan Todd left attendees with one final advocacy takeaway: “It’s a new Administration with training wheels still on. . . they’ll ultimately get their balance. . . . If you have priorities, educate your congressional members on [them]. . . your voice is really, really important.”

For more, read OncLive’s coverage of the session here.

Conway-The Advisory BoardThe morning’s second session shifted the focus outside the Beltway to explore emerging cancer care delivery trends and potential impact on the business of providing cancer care. Lindsay Conway, MSEd, of The Advisory Board, briefed attendees on The State of Today’s Cancer Programs, highlighting five key trends shaping the delivery and business cancer care delivery:

  • Healthcare reimbursement and reform is at a pivotal point. Uncertainty continues around the future of the ACA and the insurance exchanges.
  • Increasing numbers of cancer patients with comorbidities requiring enhanced care coordination. From 2000 to 2010, the number of Medicare patients with multiple chronic conditions grew 22%. Proactive steps in care coordination for this population include regular distress screening to identify issues early and devising and implementing care maps for navigators.
  • Telehealth technology bringing care to patients where they are. These technologies and emerging patient-centered tools—ranging from real-time virtual visits, to phone apps, to patient portals, to remote patient monitoring—have tremendous capacity for expanding patient access to care
  • Growth of healthcare consumerism requiring cost and quality information. There are growing online resources for healthcare review, cost and quality information. To address consumerism in cancer care, it’s important for cancer programs to provide information to help patients select the right provider and the right services.
  • Genomic medicine is transforming cancer care. With the rapid pace of change in this area, cancer programs are challenged to invest carefully as they move forward to integrate precision medicine into practice.

More coverage on this session is available here.  To learn more about the ACCC 43rd Annual Meeting, CANCERSCAPE,  visit us at accc-cancer.org.

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