Tag Archives: ACA repeal and replace

Update from Capitol Hill

By Brittney Fairman, MPS, MA, ACCC Policy Analyst

U.S. CapitolAt the end of last week, it was anticipated that the U.S. Senate would hold a vote on the Senate Republicans’ revised version of the Better Care Reconciliation Act (BCRA) today, Tuesday, July 18. However, over the weekend,  Senator John McCain (R-AZ) underwent an emergency surgery and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY) announced that the vote on BCRA would be postponed until Senator McCain’s return to Washington, D.C. With two Senators, Rand Paul (R-KY) and Susan Collins (R-ME), already openly opposed to voting ‘Yes’ on BCRA—Senator McCain’s absence would have put the Republican Senators’ vote on the bill at risk.

In order to continue the repeal and replace of the Affordable Care Act (ACA), Senate Republicans would need at least 50 of the 52 Senate Republicans to vote in favor of BCRA.

On Monday evening, the bill took another turn when Senator Mike Lee (R-UT) and Senator Jerry Moran (R-KS) jointly announced their opposition of a motion to proceed on the revised healthcare bill. These two additional defections on Senator McConnell’s bill means the Senate Majority does not currently have the votes to even begin debate on the legislation to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act (ACA).

So at this point, the future of BCRA remains uncertain. On Monday evening, Majority Leader McConnell stated, “Regretfully, it is now apparent that the effort to repeal and immediately replace the failure of Obamacare will not be successful.” President Trump has suggested the Senate Majority move forward in repealing the ACA without immediate replacement.  In this scenario, the Senate would vote in the coming days on a bill which would delay the ACA’s repeal for two years as Republicans work on individual bills to dismantle the current healthcare law.

ACCC will continue to monitor the Senate’s actions and keep ACCC members posted with the latest updates.

ACA Repeal & Replace Update: Senate Republicans Put Their Cards on the Table

By Brittney Fairman, MA, MPS, Policy Analyst, ACCC

U.S. CapitolLast Thursday, June 22, Senate Republicans publicly unveiled their discussion draft legislation titled, the Better Care Reconciliation Act—their version of the House’s recently passed American Health Care Act (AHCA) (H.R. 1628). Neither bill was drafted under regular order, as Republicans try to maintain steam in pushing forward with the repeal and replacement of the Affordable Care Act (ACA). Unfortunately, for multiple stakeholders, including many of those within the cancer care community, it is questionable how much the Republican Caucus sought patient and provider feedback to incorporate into their bills.

Although there was much speculation that the Senate version of the AHCA would undergo an entire re-write, the legislation released last week represents more of a fine-tuning of the House AHCA bill. Much of the Senate draft’s language reflects that found within the AHCA. The Senate bill contains various tax cuts for mostly high-income Americans; maintains the elimination of the individual and employer mandates; proposes less generous premium subsidies for those with lower household incomes; holds onto the AHCA’s similarly deep cuts to the Medicaid program—phasing out the expansion over three years and transitioning to a capped financing structure which essentially re-shapes the program’s funding; changes state adjustment-of-age bands by allowing insurers to increase the ACA’s ratio from allowing insurers to charge up to three times more for older individuals to permitting insurers to charge up to five time more; and still allows states to apply for waivers to overhaul their insurance markets (including the option of ending the essential health benefit requirement and potentially reinstating annual and lifetime coverage gaps).

There are, however, several notable changes within the “draft” Better Care Reconciliation Act signaling some improvement from the House bill. This Senate version would require insurers to cover people with pre-existing conditions and ban them from charging higher premiums because of their health history. But there is a caveat—there would not be an essential health benefit (EHB) requirement. This means that insurers would be able to offer less comprehensive policies that may or may not cover a patient’s treatment for pre-existing condition(s). Additionally, for individuals with household incomes between 100 percent and 200 percent of the federal poverty (FPL), authorized funding for cost-sharing reductions (CSR) payments would continue until 2020.

On Monday, June 26, the nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office (CBO) released a CBO score for the Senate legislation that finds the bill would result in 22 million more uninsured Americans by 2026, relative to the number under current law. This is slightly fewer than the increase in the number of uninsured estimated for the House-passed AHCA legislation.  According to the CBO score under the Better Care Reconciliation Act, by 2026 an estimated 49 million people will be uninsured, compared to the 28 million who will be uninsured that year under the current law.

A vote on the Senate bill is expected this week, leaving Senators with a relatively short window for reviewing the bill and also leaving stakeholders limited time to weigh in on the bill’s negative consequences for healthcare.

In a statement, the Association of Community Cancer Centers (ACCC) has expressed deep disappointment in the Senate’s draft legislation both in terms of policy and process, noting that the bill violates ACCC’s health reform principles.  ACCC believes this bill would be devastating for cancer patients and their families, and urges lawmakers to vote against the Better Care Reconciliation Act of 2017.  ACCC members can contact their Senators here.


Editor’s note: This post was updated on 6/26/17 to reflect release of the CBO score for the Better Care Reconciliation Act of 2017.