Tag Archives: Institute for Clinical Immuno-Oncology (ICLIO)

Turning on the Light Switch

June is Cancer Immunotherapy Month, shining a spotlight on advancements in immuno-oncology. 2017 ACCC Institute for Clinical Immuno-Oncology Innovator Award winner Oncology Specialists S.C. at Advocate Lutheran General Hospital has been delivering immunotherapy for cancer for more than six years. For highlights on how they’ve developed their program and how “Turning on the Light Switch” helps their providers and patients talk about managing immune-related toxicities, read on.

by Ann McGreal, RHanging BulbsN

For more than 30 years the world of oncology nursing and the patients we care for has been bound by the expectations of the known effects of chemotherapy on the human body. While these toxicities can be difficult and, at times, even life threatening, for the most part they are predictable. As experienced oncology nurses, we know that after a certain number of days the patient blood counts will likely drop. Our patients being treated with chemotherapy anticipate that they may experience nausea, diarrhea, bone pain, and other side effects. For the most part, with chemotherapy we can expect a logical start, progression, and end to toxicities.

Immuno-Oncology Brings a Paradigm Shift
However, the new dawn of immuno-oncology and the rapidly increasing use of immunotherapy for cancer have upended not only our approach to supporting oncology patients, but also how we approach the toxicities of treatment.

Our practice, Oncology Specialists at Lutheran Advocate General Hospital, in Park Ridge, Illinois, has been on the cutting edge of using immunotherapy for melanoma treatments from the beginning. We were among the highest accrual sites for the original ipilimumab clinical trials. Then, in 2011, immunotherapy took its first big step into the limelight with the FDA approval of ipilimumab for the treatment of Stage IV melanoma. The demand on our clinic for ipilimumab increased greatly.

Initially, our practice was able to deal with the need to think about symptom management in a different way because we were caring for a small population of patients—all in the melanoma space. However, in 2014, with the dawn of PD-L1 checkpoint inhibitors that all began to change. Today, the potential for this class of drug seems unlimited, with more than 500 current studies underway in the U.S., and new indications and approvals occurring on what seems like a daily basis.

Educate. Educate. Educate.
As we implemented immunotherapy in our practice, our nursing team took on the challenge of how best to educate both staff and our patients on the mechanism of action for these new therapies, as well as their potential toxicities.

We quickly learned that peer-to-peer education was the most effective way to help our medical staff develop a better understanding of immunotherapy. We also found that the real challenge lay in accepting that immunotherapy for cancer requires a different way of looking at the total treatment picture. To implement this new treatment paradigm, we needed to better educate our patients so that they had a clear understanding of how immunotherapy differed from traditional chemotherapy and why early reporting of toxicities is so important. This meant we had break through long-held beliefs such as, “everyone gets sick during cancer treatment” and “I should just ‘tough it out’ or they will stop my therapy.” We needed our patients to understand that with immunotherapy just “tough it out” can be a deadly mindset. Patients on immunotherapy need to partner with their providers and report any toxicities early so that their healthcare team can work quickly to resolve the issue.

Flipping the Switch
With this need in mind, we created a set of education tools built around the analogy of the patient’s immune system functioning like a light switch. The immunotherapy treatment turns the switch on. If the treatment starts causing toxicities, the patient’s body cannot turn the switch off by itself. Unless the toxicities are reported, the affected system (the light) will burn out. Today, these education tools and discharge instructions are the backbone of our immunotherapy program.

Next Step: Incorporating into Our EMR
With our staff education and training on managing immune-related toxicities and patient education in place, we looked at processes to ensure cohesive documentation in our EMR so that an on-call physician or covering nurse could easily pick up the treatment thread and assist patients. This not only led to the development of templates but also a standardized treatment plan for immune-related toxicities, including the use of corticosteroids.

At the ACCC 34th National Oncology Conference in October, we’ll be presenting a more in-depth look at how we have developed and grown an immunotherapy program at our practice.  We hope you’ll join us in Nashville.
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Ann McGreal, RN, is an Oncology Nurse Clinician at Advocate Lutheran General Hospital in Park Ridge, Illinois.

Read more about upcoming ACCC 34th National Oncology Conference here.

From ASCO to ICLIO to Your Program—Immunotherapy Moves into the Community

By Amanda Patton, ACCC Communications

Once again immuno-oncology (I-O) was center stage at this year’s American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Annual Meeting (June 2-6, 2017) where more than 250 presentations featured checkpoint inhibitors. Currently, six immune checkpoint inhibitors have received FDA approval for more than nine cancers, with more than 1,000 studies in progress.

On June 2 at ASCO, two pre-eminent immunotherapy investigators provided perspective on the rapidly evolving immuno-oncology landscape with a look back and a look to the future.  During their presentation, “On the Shoulders of Giants: Historical Approaches to Immunotherapy in Solid Tumors,” James P. Allison, PhD, of The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, and Suzanne L. Topalian, MD, of the Bloomberg-Kimmel Institute for Cancer Immunotherapy, touched on some of the critical challenges the oncology community faces with these new and emerging therapies, including:

  • How to deal with the flood of information from clinical studies
  • The need to better understand the biologic processes underpinning of side effects of these new therapies
  • The imperative to identify biomarkers.

Read highlights from their presentation in this ASCO Daily News article.

ICLIO’s Evolving Role—Supporting Integration of I-O into Practice
Just as insights from ASCO 2017 will continue to ripple throughout the broader cancer community for weeks and months to come; the wave of new approvals and indications in immuno-oncology will continue to spread from academic settings into community programs and practices, where it is estimated that 85% of the nation’s cancer care is delivered.

Since its inception more than two years ago, the ongoing mission of ACCC’s Institute for Clinical Immuno-Oncology (ICLIO) is to create education, resources, and tools that provide practical, real-world support for multidisciplinary team members engaged in bringing immunotherapy to patients in their communities. Hear about ICLIO’s growth and latest initiatives in this ASCO Post interview with ICLIO Advisory Committee Chair Lee Schwartzberg, MD, FACP, Chief, Division of Hematology Oncology; Professor of Medicine, The University of Tennessee; The West Clinic, PC.

ICLIO In the Community
In 2017, ICLIO launched two exciting new programs—ICLIO Visiting Experts and Case Studies in Immuno-Oncology—that bring clinicians with immunotherapy expertise out to providers in the community.

“It’s an area that ICLIO is spearheading,” said ICLIO Visiting Expert Jarushka Naidoo, MBBCh, Assistant Professor of Oncology at Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center at Johns Hopkins University and Bloomberg-Kimmel Institute for Cancer Immunotherapy.  With the ICLIO Visiting Experts program, “Investigators such as myself who are particularly interested in immunotherapy can actually go to community providers and give our hands-on experience of how we give these agents, what are the common side effects that we see, and what are some of the ways we’ve gotten around some of those particular considerations. We’re able to interact with the workshop participants one-on-one and talk about specific cases they’ve managed, some challenges they’ve had, and how we might have dealt with that from an academic perspective.”

Learn more in this Hem/Onc Today interview with Dr. Naidoo:

For the just-launched Case Studies in Immuno-Oncology, an ICLIO faculty member will travel to an ACCC-member program for a 60-minute case-based tumor board discussion on immunotherapy treatment decision-making and the management of associated immune-related adverse events. Learn more and apply.

Immuno-Oncology Advances from ASCO 2017
Access top-level takeaways on advances in immunotherapy for cancer from the ASCO 2017 Annual Meeting in this  ICLIO webinar presented by Lee Schwartzberg, MD, FACP.  View webinar.

View all ICLIO has to offer by visiting accc-iclio.org.


Editor’s note: This post was updated on 6/28/17.

Cooling Down ICER? Five Questions to Consider

By ACCC Communications

Three jigsaw puzzles pieces (sm)Although the value-based reimbursement train has definitely left the station and is picking up speed, those in the oncology community continue to grapple with the thorny issues around understanding and defining value in cancer care. Treatment innovations and costs are driving the value discussion in oncology. New and emerging immuno-oncology therapies, while bringing unprecedented clinical value to many patients, often carry price tags of $100,000 a year or more, and are front and center in these discussions. Patient access in an era of high-priced pharmaceuticals continues to be a major challenge, particularly as many of these innovative therapeutics entail high co-pays and/or co-insurance payments. The result is that some patients face major hurdles to accessing these innovative options.

For those in the oncology community, staying up-to-date on current and proposed value frameworks is essential—not only to advance innovation in cancer care and to ensure patient access to new therapeutic options, but also to protect cancer program economic viability in an era where payment and reimbursement may become increasingly tied to value.

In a recent Institute for Clinical Immuno-Oncology (ICLIO) webinar, a panel of leading experts provided real-world perspectives on value framework development in oncology in the U.S., with a particular focus on the Institute for Clinical and Economic Review (ICER), which has gained prominence in the past 18 months.  For those in the oncology community who may not be familiar with ICER, panelist Jennifer Hinckel, MSc, McGivney Global Advisors, provided background and offered the following five questions to consider in assessing the organization’s recent report related to non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC):

  • Does ICER have the appropriate expertise to interpret complex clinical data given that there are not disease-specific clinical experts on staff or advisory panels?
  • Does ICER have processes in place to adequately prevent or limit bias or policy/political aims from slipping into its reports?
  • Is ICER’s approach of evaluating products close to the time of approval (or pre-approval) appropriate, given its methodology of including only randomized controlled trial (RCT) data?
  • Does ICER have sufficient staffing to review and update reports in disparate disease areas and to ensure accuracy?
  • Would ICER’s various approaches meet the standards of peer view in a widely published journal?

In a recent op-ed published in the Oncology Business Review, leading lung cancer experts (including ICLIO Advisory Committee Chair, Lee Schwartzberg, MD, FACP) suggest some level-setting principles for value frameworks including the following:

  • Have disease experts as evaluators and authors
  • Have patient-centered endpoints, conclusions, and definitions of value
  • Use rigorous methodologies reflecting evidence-based medicine
  • Apply continuous review and revision
  • Hold peer review and authorship to scientific standards.

Listen to the full ICLIO webinar discussion here.

As noted in a newly-released white paper from the Institute for Clinical Immuno-Oncology, all of the existing first-generation value frameworks have strengths and weaknesses. Each wrestles with defining value, and each exposes inherent tensions between payer concepts of value and the perspectives of patients and providers. As the field of immuno-oncology continues to expand, all stakeholders will need to stay informed and be prepared contribute to ongoing development of value frameworks that consider not only cost and clinical benefit, but patients’ perspectives on value in cancer care.  In the months ahead as the oncology community contributes to the discussion on value determination methodologies in the context of payer negotiations and political pressure to lower costs and enact drug pricing reform, as well as working to ensure access to new and emerging immunotherapy and combination therapies, ICLIO will continue to offer support and resources for the multidisciplinary team serving patients in communities close to home.


ICLIO is an Institute of the Association of Community Cancer Centers (ACCC). In September 2016,  ACCC submitted comments in response to ICER’s national call for proposed improvements to its Value Assessment Frameworks. 

Immuno-Oncology: Moving Forward Together

By Lee S. Schwartzberg, MD, FACP, Chair, ICLIO Advisory Committee

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As the momentum surrounding immuno-oncology continues to build, the Institute for Clinical Immuno-Oncology (ICLIO) is meeting the need for practical, real-world resources and education for all members of the multidisciplinary cancer care team.  Find out how in this just-released ICLIO white paper, which illuminates current progress with these exciting therapies, real-world challenges, and emerging concerns around continued access as immunotherapy moves into the community setting.

You’ll want to read Immuno-Oncology: There’s More to Discover for:

  • A concise recap of 2016 immunotherapy clinical highlights
  • An update on ICLIO education, resources, and what to expect in 2017
  • A snapshot of policy issues and pressing concerns impacting the future of immuno-oncology in practice.

In this rapidly changing landscape, I encourage all you to partner with the ICLIO. Whatever your role in caring for patients with cancer, the latest ICLIO white paper will provide insight and perspective on the evolving field of immuno-oncology.  Through ICLIO, let’s continue to move forward together on the exciting immuno-oncology journey.

Explore the hub of immuno-oncology information and resources available for the entire multidisciplinary cancer care team at accc-iclio.org and follow ICLIO for updates. ICLIO is an institute of the Association of Community Cancer Centers (ACCC).