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Home > Mediaroom > Press Releases > 2005 > Most Physicians Not Likely to Participate in Competitive Acquisition Program, According to Association of Community Cancer Centers’ Online Survey

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Lori Gardner, Senior Director
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lgardner@accc-cancer.org

ACCC News Release

For Immediate Release: April 29, 2005

Most Physicians Not Likely to Participate in Competitive Acquisition Program, According to Association of Community Cancer Centers’ Online Survey

ROCKVILLE, Md.—The Association of Community Cancer Centers (ACCC) recently surveyed physician practice members on their level of interest in participating in the Competitive Acquisition Program (CAP). Generally, most respondents do not appear willing to participate in the CAP. Not surprising, respondents are more likely to work through a CAP vendor if a practice cannot obtain drugs for less than average sales price (ASP) plus 6 percent.

Beginning on January 1, 2006, physicians in private practice will have the choice of directly purchasing drugs and being paid based on the ASP methodology or electing to obtain drugs through a CAP vendor instead. Overwhelmingly, respondents—regardless of specific practice demographics—tend to view CAP as administratively burdensome and resource intensive.

"As proposed in the draft rule, the CAP is not going to work until the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services recognizes the extensive administrative resources that physicians electing the CAP will incur," said Deborah Walter, ACCC Senior Director, Policy and Government Affairs. In fact, physicians who responded to the survey identified the perceived administrative burden as the principal issue affecting their decision not to participate. Ms. Walter added, "The failure to address the administrative burden and additional resources that the program may require could discourage participation in the CAP and undercut the enhanced access to cancer drugs that might otherwise be obtainable through the CAP."

Also problematic is the perception by respondents to maintain separate inventories—which most practices do not find feasible given space limitations. These shortcomings seem to outweigh any benefits that the program offers.

"This administrative obligation does not exist under the average sales price-based reimbursement system and could impose substantial costs on participating physicians,” said Thomas A. Marsland, MD, an oncologist with Florida Oncology Associates in Orange Park, Fla. "While it is not uncommon for physicians to create separate inventories for research drugs as part of a research contract," added Dr. Marsland, “the notable difference is that physicians are compensated."

About the Association of Community Cancer Centers
The Association of Community Cancer Centers (ACCC) is the leading advocacy and education organization for the multidisciplinary cancer care team. More than 23,000 cancer care professionals from over 2,500 hospitals and practices nationwide are affiliated with ACCC. Providing a national forum for addressing issues that affect community cancer programs, ACCC is recognized as the premier provider of resources for the entire oncology care team. Our members include medical and radiation oncologists, surgeons, cancer program administrators and medical directors, senior hospital executives, practice managers, pharmacists, oncology nurses, radiation therapists, social workers, and cancer program data managers. For more information, visit ACCC's website at www.accc-cancer.org. Follow us on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, and read our blog, ACCCBuzz.

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