ACCC logo
Facebook  LinkedIn  Twitter  ACCC Youtube Channel  ACCCBuzz blog

Association of Community Cancer Centers

The leading education and advocacy organization for the multidisciplinary cancer team

ACCCBuzz Blog  Find a Cancer Program  Log in to MyNetwork

Home > Publications > Cancer Program Guidelines > Chapter 6

Cancer Program Guidelines

Chapter 6: Community Outreach

Section 6.1. Cancer Education and Resource Program
Section 6.2. Cancer Control and Detection

Section 1: Cancer Education and Resource Program

Guideline I
Education and educational resources are provided for cancer patients and their families, friends, and caregivers through structured programs defined in an educational plan.

Rationale
Education enables cancer patients and their families, friends, and caregivers to make informed decisions about their treatment and symptom management and improves their quality of life.

Characteristics

  1. The patient education plan includes, but is not limited to:
    1. Program mission, goals, and objectives
    2. Policy and procedures
    3. Methodology for determining topics
    4. Description of programs and services offered
    5. Appropriate resources to accomplish goals
    6. Outcome evaluation of programs and services.
  2. Patient and family education is centralized and available within the facility.
  3. Patient and family education programs are based on patient and family needs, changes in clinical care, evidence-based complementary services, research, and local/state/national issues.
  4. Programs are developed and implemented by members of the multidisciplinary team or selected experts, including patients and families in the development process.
  5. Appropriate resources are committed to develop and provide patient and family education.
  6. The programmatic content of patient education programs should include, but is not limited to:
    1. Cancer therapy
    2. Side effects and symptom management
    3. Nutrition
    4. Venous access devices
    5. Coping with cancer
    6. Location and availability of community resources (e.g., screening mammography) for early detection
    7. Rehabilitation and survivorship
    8. Pain control
    9. End-of-life/quality-of-life issues
    10. Complementary treatment methods (guided by policy)
  7. A list of available cancer education programs and resources is developed and made available to medical staff, patients, and the community. Efforts are made to coordinate programs and/or services with relevant community agencies, resources, cooperative groups, and other health care entities.
  8. An oncology professional is accountable for patient and family education programs.
  9. A cancer-related resource center (library) is available to the public, patients, and their families, friends, and caregivers.
  10. Access to an on-line education center designed to offer a complete set of cancer information to bring patients, families, and community members the latest news and information about cancer. The site should offer a comprehensive collection of cancer education resources including the latest treatment news, in-depth information on specific cancer types, message boards, newsletters and support groups and feature articles, and inspirational stories, cancer dictionary, and consumer drug guide.
  11. A quarterly patient newsletter is provided, designed to enhance knowledge of services available to help support cancer patients, their families, and caregivers with the cancer experience.

REFERENCES

Please note: While every attempt has been made to ensure the accuracy of the publications, addresses, phone numbers, and websites, ACCC cannot ensure that this information has not changed. Web addresses, in particular, change frequently. If you find that a web address has changed, try to locate the publication name through an online search engine.

National Cancer Institute. Cancer Topics. www.cancer.gov/cancertopics.
Phone: 800.422.6237.


Section 2: Cancer Control and Detection

Guideline I
Cancer control and detection programs are available to reduce risk of developing cancer, teach self-examination and symptom identification techniques, provide screening guidelines, and communicate the availability of community resources for early detection.

Rationale
Cancer control and detection include education about high-risk behaviors, environmental and lifestyle modifications, and methods to reduce risk of developing cancer.  Early detection is the discovery of cancer at an early stage, maximizing potential for cure.

Characteristics

  1. Primary prevention programs focus on interventions that reduce the risk of cancer through:
    1. Eliminating or limiting exposure to causative factors
    2. Promoting protective factors
    3. Reducing high-risk behaviors
    4. Cancer prevention and control research.
  2. Cancer control recognizes that prevention of cancer is at best anecdotal and while there are research findings that have identified some chemical actions/reactions that appear to have prevented cancer, there are few actions that a person can take that will prevent the disease. Cancer control includes public education about high-risk behaviors and the use of protective factors or the elimination of exposure to causative factors along with education related to early detection.
  3. Early detection programs include the following elements:
    1. Identification and surveillance of high-risk groups
    2. Promotion of reliable and valid screening techniques for cervical, breast, colorectal, oral, skin, testicular, prostate, and any other cancers that have tumor markers and/or screening tests.

Guideline II
Public education programs and materials are available and presented throughout the community on a regular basis.  Teaching plans incorporate sensitivity to the cultural, religious, and ethnic beliefs of high-risk groups.

Rationale
Public awareness is important in the prevention and early detection of cancer.

Characteristics

  1. Community outreach education should increase awareness of the following:
    1. Control techniques to reduce the risk of developing cancer
    2. Self-examination and symptom-identification techniques
    3. Screening guidelines for the public
    4. Access to community resources for early detection.
  2. The Cancer Committee is responsible for periodically assessing the needs of the community and the outcomes of current programs to define which early detection programs are needed.
  3. The public education program includes, but is not limited to:
    1. Program mission, goals, and objectives
    2. Policy and procedures
    3. Methodology for determining topics
    4. Description of programs and services offered
    5. Appropriate resources to accomplish goals
    6. Outcome evaluation of programs and services.
  4. Documentation of all public education activities is maintained and shared with the Cancer Committee.
  5. An oncology professional is accountable for public education programs.

REFERENCES

Please note: While every attempt has been made to ensure the accuracy of the publications, addresses, phone numbers, and websites, ACCC cannot ensure that this information has not changed. Web addresses, in particular, change frequently. If you find that a web address has changed, try to locate the publication name through an online search engine.

  1. American College of Surgeons. Commission on Cancer: Cancer Program Standards 2009. www.facs.org/cancer/coc/cocprogramstandards.pdf.
    Page 71. Phone: 312.202.5085.
  2. Oncology Nursing Society. Clinical Practice: Detection/Prevention. http://www.ons.org/clinicalresources/Prevention.
    Phone: 866.257.4667.
  3. National Comprehensive Cancer Network. NCCN Practice Guidelines for Detection, Prevention, and Risk Reduction 2009. Available at www.nccn.org/professionals/physician_gls/
    f_guidelines.asp#detection. Phone: 888.909.6226 (patients); 215.690.0300 (cancer care  professionals).

Copyright © 2017 Association of Community Cancer Centers. All Rights Reserved.
1801 Research Boulevard, Suite 400, Rockville, MD 20850  |  Tel.: 301.984.9496  |  Fax: 301.770.1949

CONTACT US